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You Won't Rust If You Rest

" What you want and what you will

Working for your dollar bill

... Nine to five you know the drill

Weekends are a short-lived thrill." Reggae Artiste Damian Marley.


We live in a rise-and-grind culture. Of course, we have to work to provide for our basic needs, but some of us never seem to stop for respite. This post is the unpublished portion of It's Perfectly Fine To Chill.



There is probably no more incredible feeling than to see our commitment and dedication to an endeavor pay off in significant ways. For context, please think of how often you've watched an award show or seen someone receive an award. How frequently do they mention hard work in their acceptance speech? Or the unbridled joy you feel when your hard work pays off?


I'm not a geneticist, but I can imagine hard work is imprinted in our DNA.


It never ceases to amaze me how hard people work to make ends meet. I won't bother to mention our multitasking ways, such as answering the phone while sending an email or working lunch. Still, sometimes, it seems like it is not enough, so we plan to double our efforts because our hard work will eventually pay off.


The industry that people show is awe-inspiring. It is not hard for us to grow up and value hard work when it seems to be the foundation for success and the most critical ingredient. At some point, though, we must stop to think about our overall wellness.


We must begin to recognize that burnout is a thing. Often, we work long hours not because we have to but because others are doing it, and we do not want to be left behind. Not only do we not want to fall behind, but we do not wish to be seen as not pulling our weight.


Work shouldn't consume you even if you find meaning in your work. There's a debate over the meaning of work-life balance and if it is possible to balance both. Some argue that work-life balance pits work and life into direct opposition. On the other side of the debate, there needs to be a separation between life and work; you shouldn't discuss work when you are off the clock so your life isn't consumed with work. Further, if you have connections outside of the office with your colleagues, work should not be one of the topics of discussion.


The stress and anxiety of keeping up with others or overextending ourselves wear on our minds and bodies. It interferes with our quality of life; we may become avoidant as a means of coping and no longer find pleasure in what we used to enjoy doing. Resulting in constant worrying, lack of quality sleep, tension headaches, and body pains. In extreme cases, we may find ourselves using unhealthy means to cope with our daily stressors by overindulging in drugs and alcohol to feel better.


The Pew Research Center published insightful data on U.S. workers' use of paid time off and their reasons for not using it.


I am not promoting an anti-hard work sentiment, which is far from it. My motivation here is to encourage people to develop a healthier lifestyle. A healthier lifestyle that directly supports a better quality of life. I invite you to think of your wellness and, more broadly, how you overlook it either because you are on the grind or because you believe you do not have the time or resources to participate in wellness activities.


The most recent data from the Global Wellness Institute sheds light on the cost of the global wellness economy. I acknowledge that sometimes, or too often, we see wellness as an expense on our monthly budget. We have monetized wellness, and the cost continues skyrocketing, making it seem less affordable and accessible. In that case, we consider wellness an additional fee that requires disposable income we cannot afford to spend.


Doing less sounds easy, but doing so is an entirely different conversation. But we will have to begin that journey with a single step. Should you not know where to put your foot for the first step, I recommend the website actionforhappiness.org, which provides monthly calendars with suggestions for health and wellness activities. Each day has an activity, and the calendars are available for download and print in several languages. Each month addresses a different theme, and this month is active in April.


Self-care is a lifelong practice. You are, in fact, capable of practicing self-care, and the more consistent you are, the more you reinforce its value in your life.  

 

Empowering Minds. Inspiring Lives.

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